A preposition is a word that creates a relationship between an object and another word within a sentence. Examples of prepositions include that, which, on, at, around, of, about, between, for, with—we could go on and on.

Now, some of you may have noticed we ended the last sentence with a preposition (well, several, actually). This begs the question: Can you end a sentence in a preposition? Sure, if you want to!

The once hard-line rule on not ending a sentence with a preposition is now widely thought to be antiquated and even an “ill founded superstition,” according to the Chicago Manual of Style. To quote Winston Churchill, “That is the type of arrant pedantry up with which I shall not put.”

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