Short Answer

Loose: able to be removed, not tight

Lose: to misplace something, to be deprived of something

Long Answer

Many people, while perusing the newspaper or a book, do not know the difference between lose and loose. Common mistake? We think so.

Loose is most often used as an adjective and means “not tightly attached” or “easily set free”; for example, her shoes were too big for her feet and were therefore very loose.

Lose, on the other hand, is a verb and means “to no longer have something”; for example, her shoes were too big for her feet, causing her to lose them every time she started running.

If it helps, use both words in the same sentence to help keep their meanings disparate: because her shoes were too big and loose, she was always losing them.

English Grammar - Loose v Lose

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Get a FREE QUOTE for Your Project Now!

Our expert editors and proofreaders are available for you anytime (day or night!) with affordable and personalized professional services.

YOU MIGHT ALSO LIKE

Promotional Brochures: How Smart Copy Brings in Business

Oct 08, 2011 in Proofreading

Effective writing brings in business. And whether you run a small business or a multinational corporation, or whether your brochure is a simple trifold or…

Power of Proofreading

The Power of Proofreading Part Two

May 04, 2013 in Proofreading

"OK, I'll bite," you decide, joining us in this second part of our series The Power of Proofreading. "What is the definition of proofreading?" In…

National Proofreading Day

Happy National Proofreading Day!

Mar 07, 2012 in Proofreading

Today, March 8, is National Proofreading Day! National Proofreading Day promotes mistake-free writing and communication to enhance a personal and professional image, according to the…

Subscribe to Our Blog

Subscribe via RSS