You may ask, “Why are we doing a post on two common, not-confused-very-often words? Everyone knows what quiet and quite mean!” Well, the answer is simple: The difficulty people have with the words isn’t with understanding their meanings. When typing quite and quiet, however, people frequently make typing errors and write one word instead of the other.

Quite and Quiet

Quite is an adjective that describes the size of something, while quiet means to—shhhh!!!—lower your volume. Spell-check never picks up on this mishap because they are both correct; they just have different meanings. This is where proofreading comes in, either done by you or by a trusted friend or teacher—or us! If you use these words while writing, make sure you use the proper one to prevent silly errors.

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